The Kambarang Season

The Noongar Six Seasons

The Noongar people who lived on the land for centuries more commonly know the region as the Rainbow Coast, dividing the year into six distinct seasons; Birak, Bunrur, Djeran, Makuru, Djilba and Kambrang. Each season distinguished by the changes of the land which influenced hunting, gathering and how the land was managed to help it regenerate the following year.

Noongar Seasons Calendar


Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June
July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec
Birak
Bunuru
Djeran
Makuru
Djilba
Kambarang
Birak
Hot and Dry
Warm Easterly Winds
Cool & pleasant
Cold and Wet
Cold with lessening rains
Warming, rains finishing
Hot and Dry
Noongar burned sections of scrubland to force animals into the open.
Hottest part of the year, with sparse rainfall throughout. Noongar moved to estuaries for fishing.
Cooler weather begins. Fishing continued and bulbs and seeds were collected for food.
Cold fronts continue. This is usually the wettest part of the year. The rains replenish inland water resources.
Usually the coldest part of the year, with clear, cold days and nights, and warmer, rainy and windy periods. Roots were collected, emus, possums and kangaroo were hunted.

Longer dry periods and fewer cold fronts cross the coast. The height of the wildflower season. Noongar moved towards the coast where frogs, tortoises and freshwater crayfish were caught.
wikipedia: Noongar

Hot and dry. Noongar burned sections of scrubland to force animals into the open.
When to seeWildflowers:
Wildflowers
Wildflowers
Wildflowers
Wildflowers
Wildflowers
When to see
Whales:

Table courtesy of Rainbow Coast

Kambarang Season

Kambarang is the end of the rains and the height of Wildflower season for Noongar people of the south west of Australia. Fewer rains fall across the region and longer days warm the land. This was the season to migrate to the coast where frogs, tortoises and freshwater crayfish were plenty. The last of the whales 'Mammang'  can be seen as the last of them migrate along the coast in October.

kangaroo-paw

The Rainbow Coast

The South West region is more commonly known by the Noongar people as the Rainbow Coast, named after Makura and Djilba winter seasons. This is the time of year where rains give life to the land and the vibrant colours of the Rainbow Coast emerge and where the region gets its name.

Art by Yondee ‘Shane Hansen’, Noongar Aboriginal Artist - The connection between the raindrop and the colour of the land

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